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Can You Use Neosporin on a Cat?

Can You Use Neosporin on a Cat?

Can You Use Neosporin on a Cat?

Neosporin is one of those things that almost everyone has somewhere in their home, commonly used to help cuts heal quicker. It’s actually a combination of three different antibiotics: neomycin, bacitracin, and polymyxin B. But, can you use Neosporin on a cat if they get a cut or scratch?

I found myself asking myself that question when my kitty came in with a scratch on her back. As hard as I try, I just can’t seem to keep her inside. And, even though she has no claws, she is still pretty fearless. Here is what I learned about Neosporin and cats. 

Will Your Cat Be Attracted to the Smell or Taste of Neosporin?

We all know how curious cats are by nature. There aren’t many things that they will shy away from at first. They’ll use a combination of their five senses to thoroughly investigate anything that interests them. And, they are always curious about anything that they see you using.

Some cats may be attracted to the smell and taste of Neosporin, and some may not. One thing’s for sure though. Anything that goes on their fur will end up in their mouths. Even if they don’t like the taste of it, they will lick it off of their coat while cleaning themselves.

Is Neosporin Safe for Cats if They Lick It?

Neosporin is formulated as a topical agent that will help fight off infections, and is very useful for helping wounds heal quicker. But, it isn’t intended to be ingested. But, as long as there aren’t any added ingredients or pain killers in the antibiotic, and it’s used in moderation, it won’t make them sick if they lick it off of their fur. 

Can You Use Neosporin on a Cat to Heal Their Wounds?

Neosporin isn’t formulated to heal deep wounds or gashes. These will most likely need medical attention. But, for minor cuts and scratches, it will be just as effective as a topical antibiotic for your cat as it is for you. The real challenge is keeping them from licking the Neosporin off of their fur. 

How Can You Put Neosporin on a Cat and Keep Them From Licking It Off?

That’s the tricky part. They will eventually lick it off of their fur if they can get to it with their tongues. Cats instinctively clean themselves throughout the day. And, they will pay special attention to any areas that are bothering them. Here are some ways that you can apply Neosporin and keep them from licking it off.

  • Apply it with a cotton ball or cotton swab. Try to use as little as possible and get as much absorbed into the skin as you can.
  • If your kitty likes to cuddle, try keeping them on your lap for a while to give the medicine a chance to work.
  • Reapply the ointment often. You know that they will lick it off. So, keep an eye on it as much as possible and dab on a little more as needed.
  • You can try bandages. Ones that wrap around their bodies will work better than the ones that are adhesive. They won’t like it. But, it will keep them from licking the ointment off.
  • You can also use headgear. The cones that wrap around their neck will keep them from licking it off. If you choose this route, it’s a good idea to take the cone off for a while to let them clean themselves. Then, you can apply some more Neosporin and put the cone back on.

How Long Should You Use Neosporin on Your Cat?

Minor cuts, scrapes, and scratches should start to heal within a couple of days. Sometimes, it’s hard to tell how deep a wound is on animals because of all of the fur. If you are using Neosporin on your cat, and the wound doesn’t seem to be healing, the cut is probably deeper than you think, meaning you’ll need a vet visit to help with the wound. 

So, yes, you can use Neosporin on a cat to help heal minor cuts and scrapes. It’s just not quite as easy as it is to use on yourself. Prepare yourself for a little battle to keep it on them, but they will love all of the extra attention from you. That’s for sure!

If you have any other ways to keep ointments on your cats or any comments or questions about using Neosporin, I’d love to hear about them. Feel free to drop me a line! 

Sources:

Wikipedia, Neosporin
Texas A&M University Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, A Cat’s Five Senses

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